Bechuanaland Protectorate

 

Map of Bechuanaland ProtectorateFlag of the High Commissioner for Bechuanaland Protectorate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Bechuanaland Protectorate was a protectorate established on 31 March 1885 by Great Britain in southern Africa. The protectorate became the Republic of Botswana on 30 September 1966. Bechuanaland meant the country of the Bechuana (now written Batswana or Tswana). Bechuanaland was divided in two. The southern part, known as British Bechuanaland, later became part of the Cape Colony and is now in South Africa. This is the area around Mafikeng (then called Mafeking). The Bechuanaland Protectorate formed the northern part; its territory was expanded north in 1890.

 

The British government originally expected to turn over administration of the protectorate to Rhodesia or South Africa, but Tswana opposition left the protectorate under British rule until Independence in 1966. The Bechuanaland Protectorate was technically a protectorate rather than a colony, but this was a legal distinction of little practical significance.

 

The protectorate was administered from Mafeking (now Mafikeng), creating a unique situation of the capital of the territory being located outside of it.

The eastern part of the colony was originally claimed by Matabeleland, and in 1887 Samuel Edwards (working for Cecil Rhodes) obtained a mining concession.

In 1891 administration of the protectorate was given to the High Commissioner for South Africa; in 1895 the British South Africa Company attempted to acquire the area, but three Tswana chiefs visited London to protest and were successful in fending off the BSAC. Later attempts to develop also had little effect.

 

The Bechuanaland Protectorate was one of the "High Commission Territories", the others being Basutoland (now Lesotho) and Swaziland. The official with the authority of a Governor was the High Commissioner. This office was first held by the Governor of the Cape, then by the Governor-General of South Africa, by British High Commissioners and Ambassadors to South Africa until independence. Consequently, administration was headed in each territory by a Resident Commissioner, who thus had approximately the same functions of a Governor but somewhat less authority.

 

 

Captial:                      Mafikeng

Government:              British protectorate

Area:                         581.730 km²

Population:                 600.000 (1966)

Currency:                   Pound (20 shillings, 1 shilling = 12 pence), from 1961 Rand (100 cents)

 

 

 

For more stamps see:

Botswana

 

 

 

Links

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate in Wikipedia.

Flag of the High Commissioner for Basutoland, the Bechuanaland Protectorate and Swaziland in Flags of the World.

 

 

 

Stamp catalogue

 

UPU 75th anniversary

date:                  10 October 1949

designer:            -

printer:               Waterlow & Sons, London (1 and 4), Bradbury, Wilkinson & Co., New Malden (2 and 3)

perforated:         13½:14 (1 and 4), 11:11½ (2 and 3)

 

1     1½ d            Hermes, globe, letter, airplane, boat, train, text "UNIVERSAL / POSTAL UNION / 1874 1949"

                          blue

                          (cat. Michel 124/SG 138/Yvert 88)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

2     3 d               hemispheres, airplane, steamer, text "1874 / UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION / 1949"

                          deep blue

                          (cat. Michel 125/SG 139/Yvert 89)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

3     6 d               Hermes scattering letters over globe, text "UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION / 1874 / 1949"

                          magenta

                          (cat. Michel 126/SG 140/Yvert 90)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

4     1/-              UPU monument, Berne, text "UNIVERSAL / POSTAL / UNION / 1874 / 1949" and "UNION

                          POSTALE UNIVERSELLE"

                          olive

                          (cat. Michel 127/SG 141/Yvert 91)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

 

Freedom from Hunger Campaign

date:                  4 June 1963

designer:            Mchael Goaman

printer:               Harrison & Sons, London

perforated:         14¼:14½

 

5     12½ cts        collection of 'protein foods', text "FREEDOM FROM HUNGER"

                          bluish green

                          (cat. Michel 169/SG 182/Yvert 133)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

 

ITU Centenary

date:                  17 May 1965

designer:            Michael Goaman

printer:               Johan Enschede en Zonen, Haarlem

perforated:         11:11½

 

6     2½ c            globe and flash, text on telex tape "INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION /

                          + CENTENARY + 1865 + 1965"

                          red, bistre yellow

                          (cat. Michel 177/SG 190/Yvert 141)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

7     12½ c          globe and flash, text on telex tape "INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION /

                          + CENTENARY + 1865 + 1965"

                          mauve, brown

                          (cat. Michel 178/SG 191/Yvert 142)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

 

International Co-operation Year

date:                  25 October 1965

designer:            Victor Whiteley

printer:               Harrison & Sons, London

perforated:         14½

 

8     1 c               ICY emblem, text "1965 / INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATION YEAR"

                          reddish purple, turquoise green

                          (cat. Michel 179/SG 192/Yvert 143)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

9     12½ c          ICY emblem, text "1965 / INTERNATIONAL CO-OPERATION YEAR"

                          deep bluish green, lavender

                          (cat. Michel 180/SG 193/Yvert 144)

 

Bechuanaland Protectorate - stamp as described above

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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last revised: 22 September 2008